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  • Thanks for the backup :)

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  • I like those two, always did.

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  • i love "When I'm 64" which I know will make you wince, which is why I'm commenting.. but then again I love "Silly Love Songs," which I know will make you hurl (see above.)

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  • I wanted to focus on the Seattle scene, and those who were kind of regarded as "founding fathers." Aside from TAD, the other artists you mentioned weren't part of the Seattle scene. Also, I couldn't find anything to indicate that TAD is still touring, did I miss something?

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  • Funny how you didn't see your initial post as patronizing itself. Here's how there is something to 'get': it's been 50 years, and depending on where people are in life, they can easily change their minds about what they are hearing. I first heard the album at 19 in a shitty stereo version (I forget which one of the many mixes it was). The sound was overbearding and distracting and didn't like it. Ten years later, I heard the much better mono mix, was more willing to listen, and it clicked. Also, some people eventually get to the point in life where they realize music is just music, that "rock" isn't badass and that Broadway or dance hall or whatever isn't "gay" or schmaltzy" and that they no longer feel the need to assert machismo by deriding Paul's love for many different genres as anything other that just music. Just as an example and all that. So, it might yet just happen, and it's not patronizing to say that.

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  • I wasn't going to mention it, but now that you're being a patronizing dick, I feel comfortable saying that Sgt. Pepper's is easily one of the weakest Beatles albums. What is there to "get," exactly? The title track and its reprise are novelty songs, "She's Leaving Home" is a weepy precursor to the gooey schmaltz that Paul would later replicate ad nauseam, "Within You Without You" is classic George fetishization, and "When I'm 64" sounds like the theme song to a children's show. Love the Beatles, just not this particular album. White Album, Magical Mystery Tour, Revolver, Rubber Soul, just to name a few, blow it away.

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  • And if the second half of Solondz's career has hole, it's not empathy. Solondz is still working from an empathetic perspective: now, instead of empathizing with the characters, the audience empathizes with the view, with the thematic arc as a whole. This is best exemplified in Weiner Dog, a movie where I couldn't stop nodding my head, thinking to myself, "Yes, this is what people are like now. Yes, they are terrible." Sure, it's satire. It's great satire.

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  • Letts is a great actor—and even better playwright—and he can pull off those perpetually grumpy, middle-aged roles way better than his Hollywood-bred peers, but you're right, he's no Philip Seymour Hoffman. Letts can do bottled up and disaffected almost as well as PSH, but the latter had so much more range. I doubt a younger Letts would have been able to pull off the compassion of the nurse in Magnolia, for example.

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  • I am not a boomer" nor are many who get it, and I do hope you are not suggesting there are no "performative" artists since then, lol. Also if you are only 22 but a keen music listener, there is still time for you to eventually get it too, so maybe holster the holiness just yet.

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  • For me, a 22 year old, listening to Sgt. Pepper's is like witnessing a party from afar: i can appreciate that it's fun for the participants (boomers), but it all looks a bit silly to me, a bit too performative. I think I've only listened to it front-to-back maybe 5 times. That said, it's loaded with classics: "Fixing a Hole" and "A Day in the Life," as you mention, but also "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" and... well, "Mr. Kite" is good, but not a classic. So maybe not "loaded," per se, but at the very least a fascinating historical artifact.

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  • It's true what you say about 'their satanic majesties.' maybe it's a parody? but i think keef's right about sgt pepper's too.

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  • "excepting duds like When I'm 64". Kindly fuck off.

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Recent Splice Original Comments
  • "Find ecstasy in life; the mere sense of living is joy enough" I like to believe that Dickinson was warning us from the 19th century to avoid her biopic.

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  • "Whether or not you agree with this statement, or these authors’ description of Yiannopoulos as a “far right extremist,” it’s obvious that the hard-left are at war with free speech, and the very existence of his autobiography Dangerous filled them with anger. Corporations like Twitter and Facebook have the right to dictate rules for speech on their platforms, but silencing “hate speech” (an ambiguous term at best) simply pushes the extreme viewpoints underground. “Hate Speech” is such an ill-defined term that it threatens to include any perspective that does not agree with the politically correct status quo. Any conservative voice, no matter how moderate, is in danger of being censored." Thank you Andrew Moody for saying (out loud which is "hate speech" these days) in the media (left leaning) the TRUTH.

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  • Great piece Tucker. I am a wanderer of the boneyards myself. Good places to camp in a foreign town, if you can get over the fence. These days I have made friends with death. It's all okay and there's nothing to fear. That's what he tells me over a beer and bag of chips. Except for maybe clown boys huffing paint on your mound. But I guess you wouldn't know about it anyway, if you were dead. The lines are blurred indeed.

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  • I hear you,well said.

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  • Actually, it doesn't even matter any more. People on the left have called so many bigots and racists for so long now the words have lost all impact.

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  • I'm just asking questions. Questions can't hurt anyone. That's what everyone tells me about Tuvel.

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  • I'm thinking you may have plunged a few too many toilets.

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  • How many feminists work in sanitation? How many work roofing jobs? Ever seen one on a fishing boat?

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  • It is possible to be conservative and do actual physical work. I plunged toilets for almost 30 years in the local school system and have remained a conservative. So it's possible. In fact, it's likely the norm. It does make me wonder, however, about the liberal snowflakes who protest Trump and the policies on the right, while being paid to do so, when in fact they just want free stuff, without actually working.

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  • Or you can call it Hillbilly Ellie Mae. J.D. Vance nailed himself an Atlantic magazine in-crowd pleaser with his pitch-perfect title. There’s something for almost everyone - Hillbilly for slurring the last deplorable underclass - Elegy for old English majors and their adult English major/Coffee Studies minor children living in the basement, who may have never read Gray’s elegy but instinctively intuit rigorous pastoral contemplation chased with a latte. In other words, yecch.

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  • Then why doesn't your headline ask if his argument is bigoted?

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  • I don't call him a bigot here, though. I say that his argument is bigoted. I'll stand by that—and can now do so without typos.

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