Splicetoday
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  • Isn't this article a kind of Kindlering of Kindler?

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  • Probably because when pressed, she totally went wishy-washy on the claim.

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  • I don't understand why more wasn't made about Megyn Kelly claiming to have been poisoned the night of the first GOP debate in August 2015. She said someone gave her a coffee and she could barely keep it together during the debate. When she moved to NBC in a much less prominent position, less hours, I was sure it was because she was scared for her life after that incident. Wildly underreported.

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  • This is funny and it is smart. So glad I read this. Humor will keep us sane. More of this, please.

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  • Great piece Spike. You made my day.

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  • Agreed. The Matrix would almost be better. Then we could break out of the pods...

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  • This country has been drowning since the Eisenhower Doctrine

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  • I hope you're right

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  • Spot on. Excellent!

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  • Dain. Let me give you a little argumentative weaponry to use to further this idea: 1) I teach people this set of categories: a) Austrian School: (Institutions: Political Economy) the application of the calculus to economics, and the use of that innovation to understand Social Science. The study of human relations so that we may improve institutions and reduce those frictions that impede cooperation. Assumption: we are ignorant. (MONARCHY/ARISTOCRACY/CONSERVATISM) b) Chicago (freshwater) School:(Rule of Law, with Monetary Economics) The search for formulae under which we can make use of fiat currency to prevent currency shortages that artificially raise interest rates, but do so within the limits of natural law (non-discretion) so that we interfere as little as possible in planning and organizing production distribution and trade while doing so. Assumption: we are ignorant but can insure against shocks. (MIDDLE CLASS/CLASSICAL LIBERALISM) c) NewYork (Saltwater) School: (Discretionary Rule for the purpose of maximizing consumption). The search for the means of maximizing consumption by discretionary (non-rule-of-law) means. Assumptions: our ignorance is irrelevant since any interference in planning and damage in the medium and long term are offset by the good of increased consumption in the short term. (UNDERCLASS/GOSSIP-CLASS/LEFTISM) 2) Myth and Tradition, moral and norm, historical analogy, reason, rationalism, empirical science, and 'complete' science (a term which won't make sense to you at present), describe a sequence of decidability of increasing precision that requires increasing information. When we possess less information than needed to say, make a scientific proposition, we can rely upon those less precise tools that precede it. Not doing so is called pseudoscience - a pretense. Conversely, relying upon rationalism when sufficient information to use science is available, doing so is called pseudo-rationalism. We must match the tool to the information available - or we are engaged in either fallacy, fraud, or deceit. An austrian (practitioner of social science) will suggest that if we lack the empirical means of decidability, then we must retreat to the rational means of decidability. And this is the honest, and truthful, and scientific thing to do. Attempting to make science fit insufficient information is just fraud. Nothing more. AND ONE ARGUMENT YOU WON"T LIKE 3) You won't like this, but so called austrian economics consists of two branches. Polish Austrian (christian), and Austrian-Occupied Ukrainian(jewish). Rothbard and Mises appropriated the term "Austrian" due to anti-semitic biases. Mises was from Ukraine (L'viv), and a jewish city. Perhaps the most jewish city. But Marginalism (Austrianism), is from Poland (Menger) and vienna, and "Constructive Economics" (Jewish Economics), has nothing to do with Austrianism other than incorporating marginalism. Even so, Misesian and Rothbardian marginalism consists of ordered series, not networks (weighted sets). This error eradicates most of the importance of marginalism. Third, Jewish economics ignores the commons as well whereas the very purpose of austrian economics is the improvement of the commons. So austrian economics proper and jewish economics proper, are fundamentally different systems of thought - and mises Human Action, through at least chapter 5, is some of the most absurd pseudoscience ever penned by man. Fourth, austrianism, except for the question of the business cycle, has been fully integrated into mainstream economics. So the Mises institute continues this 'terminological appropriation' by rothbard and mises. What does all that mean: it means almost no one who works in the field of economic philosophy (the search for methods of decidability in political economy) has any idea what he or she is doing - or talking about. Hopefully this serves you. Curt Doolittle The Propertarian Institute Kiev Ukraine.

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  • Thank you, Noah. Very well put.

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  • It's been a long time since I saw the cartoon but isn't the song the beast sings when she leaves the castle a new song?

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Recent Splice Original Comments
  • No argument that Altamont was sloppily organized. When I was a kid I read that the event was thrown together just so the Stones could have cool footage for the "Gimme Shelter" doc. Little did they know.

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  • But the kids weren't staging the event. The Stones were, and the Rolling Stone article explains how every part of the planning prcess was flawed, including such basics as not having the stage high enough so people couldn't rush it.

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  • Oh, I think I settled this matter.

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  • You miss the larger picture, Chris. The Stones were of that era, clothed on Carnaby Street, Brian at Monterrey Pop festival, songs like "Dandelion," "We Love You," and "Street Fighting Man." Once hippies were out of fashion, they'd moved on, but almost all the bands of time were hippies.

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  • I think we can all agree that the Stones in 1969 saw themselves as counterculture (all hippies are counterculture, but not all counterculture is hippies). Altamont was a setback for the cc because hopeful types thought the kids could gather en masse and stage a huge event without screwing themselves up. Not true, as it turned out.

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  • I see your points Russ, but they never seemed to have a real connection with the flower children like, say, true hippies like the Greatful Dead. Their songs weren't about peace and love or any of that. I see them as adopting some of the surface elements of the hippies but being apart from the movement in general. I can't see Keith as a hippie, and certainly not Charlie Watts. David Crosby and Jerry Garcia I can see as real hippies.

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  • I agree the Stones weren't sorry they skipped Woodstock, Chris, but I'm sure at the end of the Let It Bleed tour they wanted to do something comparable. However, OF COURSE at that period they were hippies. Look at their clothes, Mick's press conferences, following up Sgt. Pepper with the very hipped Satantic Majesties Request, etc. Keith, retrospectively, might say they weren't hippies, claiming he carried a gun and all, but just remember the Hyde Park Concert after Brian died, with Mick wearing a dress and all the (dead) butterflies they planned to release.

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  • Also, to say the Stones did Altamont out of Woodstock envy isn't on the mark. They had been getting a lot of flack for their high ticket prices, and this was a way to stem the blowback.You don't try to recreate Woodstock with the reactionary Hell's Angels as your event security.

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  • This is an odd piece. Left folks can certainly cover up sexual assault by powerful people—Bill Clinton (who's admittedly more of a centrist) would be a big example. But Fox's troubles go well beyond O'Reilly, and to suggest that Vox has similar problems seems very odd. Fox covered up O'Reilly's crap for years, and that's not even mentioning Ailes. They seem to have a serious, pervasive culture of sexual harassment. Thinking that Fox is going to investigate itself adequately seems like wishful thinking at best...

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  • The Rolling Stones have never been hippies, so I'm not sure Altamont was a hippie disaster. It was a disaster of poor planning, for sure.

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  • Twitter can be creepy and dystopian in its own way....each has its own special awfulness...

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  • twitter is so much less creepy and dystopian. facebook's algorithms and the mechanics of how your feed is curated are a total mystery to the user. i mean, besides the fact that everyone and their grandmother is on Facebook, you have to be on your best behavior... and you see people express their minds that probably should keep it to themselves...

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Recent Multimedia Comments
  • But Dylan sucks. You one crazy dude, Crispin!

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  • i do love some of those songs. they were the only pop albums my parents really listened to, except maybe the cast recording of 'hair.' hazy shade, e.g.

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  • You forgot to mention "Flowers Never Bend With the Rainfall." A beautiful song that I never heard before a high school talent show, a couple friends of mine sang it.

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  • Sorta take that back about no mall. There's a couple of sclerotic shopping centers farther than I care to walk. At their best, and possibly to their credit, they were never within a million miles of a Willams Sonoma or a Safari-themed Banana Republic. Now liquor stores and sub shops. New retail paradigm needed. Maybe like ice cream men, but selling more than ice cream.

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  • No mall here upstate in Saugerties, New York - you gotta head south to Kingston to watch mall stores close. Here, I walk into town about every other day or so to food shop and pass real brick 'n mortar still, aside from the supermarket. Local shoe store, local hardware, bookstore, non-discount drug store, movie theater (the Orpheum!) and that's about it. Some earnest cute restaurants and coffee shops fill some spaces. Place has the feeling of a raggety 50s Main Street under glass, something between a scary well-done theme mall and Twilight Zone movie set, populated with extras like me. Coins can be still be found on the sidewalk. I snapped up a quarter just the other day. Gotta be careful with those pennies though. Heads only. Tails are strictly catch and release.

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  • Well I'll be. Congratulations Madeleine and Quinn and families.

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  • I left as suggested.

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  • Small family destination weddings are the best type of wedding for the exact reasons you list, especially if London is the destination. The only destination weddings I seem to be invited to tend to be in places like Houston.

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  • Too weird to do anything else, so put him in charge of children. Well, twas ever thus, I suppose.

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  • "Pip" is charitable. I've written about Mr. Grad before, who I had for 5th and 6th grade. A very, very smart guy who was curtailed by his weirdness. On payday, he'd often lay out a table of candy for the kids, all 30 of us. On the other hand, one time a girl left a note on his desk saying he had dandruff, no one squealed to the identity, and we all had detention for a week. FDR liberal who was depressed (as if he needed any more reasons) in '66 when Reagan won governor's race in CA. "An actor," he spit out.

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  • Can you write about that 5th grade teacher? He sounds like a pip.

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  • Oh, god. What jerks we were. I remember some incidents like these and they still cause me discomfort. I don't think it's the fault of our upbringing. Maybe we are all monsters until we acquire some empathy.

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